AnianZ boosted
AnianZ boosted

Dank dieser neuen App ist mir nur nochmal klarer geworden, wie TOLL ich eigentlich Podcasts finde. Man kann sie hören, WANN MAN will. Sogar auf Stopp drücken! Nie wieder FOMO! JEDER kann zuhören. Creators haben die volle Kontrolle über den FEED. Ist schon sehr sehr nice. 😊

AnianZ boosted

Become shell literate

drewdevault.com/2020/12/12/She

gemini://drewdevault.com/2020/12/12/Shell-literacy.gmi

git changing master to main by default 

@sir thanks for that nuanced look at the topic Drew. I can't speak to the social implications of that change and I don't want to make assumptions. While I'm frequently annoyed by your outbursts on other topics this was one of the most calm arguments I read on the git master debate.

@solderpunk buch7.de is very nice. Very nice people and they donate a percentage of the money to good causes.

AnianZ boosted
AnianZ boosted

How to pronounce common file formats.

GIF: yiff
JPG: huh-peeg
DOC: dook
PDF: parfait
TXT: texit
XLS: excellent
HTML: hot meal

@sir yes, that was me a while ago as well. I made the mistake of not trying to actually learn the specifics of shell scripting but just looked up how to solve my immediate problem. After I chaged that I really started liking them.

And I took a page out of your book and mainly write POSIX shell scrips, not bash. Makes the scope much more managable.

@sir ah ok. Didn't know that. Makes sense with them not beeing defined as pixels I guess.
Just got tripped up on the inches as a non-American I guess but gonum/plot/vg seems to use it as a default as well, so that fits.

@sir Nice! Have been wondering what you will come up with since you rantend about Grafana a while ago.

Just curious, why are the chart dimensions in inches?

@emersion Cool! Will put it on my list of useful tools. Have had the need for a simple reverse proxy before.

@emersion so this solves a problem which one would usually use nginx & acme client for or something like traefik, but much simpler and in one single-purpose tool?

AnianZ boosted
there is something really nice about using a statically typed, lean programming language with great documentation

yes, you may have a bunch of boilerplate in spots but that fades into muscle memory and skimmed reading fast

I can do more, faster with this language than any others and that includes release management
AnianZ boosted

Can we please, please – PLEASE! not make the nonsensical US date format month/day/year the default in applications? 🤦‍♂️

PRE 👏 TTY 👏 PLEASE

And to all users of that format: it makes no sense, it's counter-intuitive, it makes collaboration frustrating, it introduces inconsistencies and errors... Just stop. Please. Use international standards.
(And don't get me started on your other units of weights, volumes and distances. Bloody hell.)

Boost if I'm right.

AnianZ boosted

Was für eine informative und reflektierte Folge @DLF@twitter.com „Der Tag“ @meschimeschkat@twitter.com und Team da mal wieder abgeliefert haben.
Dank Systempresse-Flatrate (GEZ) sogar ohne Schleichwerbungs- und Bettelpausen. 💜

deutschlandfunk.de/der-tag-pro

@fribbledom pretty much my main way to search through postgres, shell and other docs

AnianZ boosted
AnianZ boosted

Reminder that git is incredibly simple if you learn it from the inside out instead of the outside in 

An object can be a blob, tree, commit, or tag. An object is identified by its ID, which is a SHA.

A blob is just some arbitrary data. Files are represented as blobs.

Trees are a list of blob IDs and other tree IDs, and their names. Directories are represented as trees.

A commit has a tree ID, an author, a date, a parent commit ID (or IDs, for a merge commit), and a commit message.

A reference is just a commit ID. Branches are a kind of reference. The only information which is stored to represent "master" is the ID of the latest commit. To get the commit log, you just follow the parent ID in each commit. To get the contents, you look at the tree ID of that commit. To update master, create a new commit and write its ID to .git/refs/heads/master (which is a plaintext file).

A tag has a commit ID, an author, and a message. It just calls out a specific commit as special, like a release number, and adds a message, such as that version's changelog.

All git commands are just a means of manipulating what is ultimately a very simple data store. If you want to know more about how a specific command works and how it relates to this data store, let me know.

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